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Agisoft PhotoScan 1.4.5 License Key: Types, Prices, and Benefits



Agisoft PhotoScan 1.4.5 License Key: What You Need to Know




Are you looking for a software that can help you create high-quality 3D models from images? Do you want to know how to get a license key for Agisoft PhotoScan 1.4.5, one of the most popular and advanced software for photogrammetry?




Agisoft PhotoScan 1.4.5 License Key



If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this article is for you. In this article, you will learn:


  • What is Agisoft PhotoScan and what are its features?



  • Why do you need a license key to use Agisoft PhotoScan?



  • How to install and activate Agisoft PhotoScan on your computer?



  • How to capture images and preprocess them for Agisoft PhotoScan?



  • How to use Agisoft PhotoScan to create 3D models from images?



  • How to improve your results and avoid common errors?



By the end of this article, you will have a clear understanding of what Agisoft PhotoScan is, how it works, and how to get a license key for it.


System Requirements and Installation Procedure




Before you can use Agisoft PhotoScan, you need to make sure that your computer meets the minimum system requirements for the software. According to the official website of Agisoft PhotoScan, the minimum system requirements are:


Component


Minimum Requirement


Operating System


Windows 7 or later, Mac OS X 10.12 or later, Linux (64-bit)


CPU


Quad-core Intel Core i7 CPU, Socket LGA 1150 or 1155 (Kaby Lake, Skylake, Broadwell, Haswell, Ivy Bridge or Sandy Bridge)


RAM


12 GB


GPU


Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 or higher (optional)


HDD/SSD


At least 20 GB of free space, SSD preferred


Internet Connection


Required for online activation and validation of the license key


If your computer meets these requirements, you can proceed to install Agisoft PhotoScan on your computer. To install Agisoft PhotoScan, you need to follow these steps:



  • Download the installation file from the official website of Agisoft PhotoScan. You can choose between the 32-bit and the 64-bit version depending on your operating system.



  • Run the installation file and follow the instructions on the screen. You can choose the destination folder and the components to install.



  • After the installation is complete, launch Agisoft PhotoScan from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut.



  • You will see a welcome screen that asks you to enter your license key or start a trial version. If you have a license key, enter it in the text box and click Activate. If you want to try the software for free, click Start Trial.



  • You will see a confirmation message that your license key has been activated or your trial version has started. Click OK to close the message and start using Agisoft PhotoScan.



Demo Mode vs. Registered Version




If you do not have a license key for Agisoft PhotoScan, you can use the software in demo mode for free. However, there are some limitations and restrictions in demo mode that you should be aware of. The main differences between demo mode and registered version are:



  • In demo mode, you can only save projects in PSZ format, which is a proprietary format of Agisoft PhotoScan. You cannot export your projects in other formats such as OBJ, PLY, PDF, etc.



  • In demo mode, you cannot use network processing or distributed computing features. You can only use your local computer resources for processing.



  • In demo mode, you cannot use Python scripting or command-line interface features. You can only use the graphical user interface of Agisoft PhotoScan.



  • In demo mode, you cannot use some advanced features such as markers, scale bars, coordinate systems, georeferencing, orthomosaic generation, etc.



  • In demo mode, you cannot print or publish your projects online.



If you want to unlock all the features and functions of Agisoft PhotoScan, you need to purchase a license key from the official website of Agisoft PhotoScan or from an authorized reseller. There are two types of license keys available: standard and floating.


Standard Activation




A standard license key is a single-user license that allows you to activate Agisoft PhotoScan on one computer only. You can use Agisoft PhotoScan on that computer without any limitations or restrictions. A standard license key costs $179 for the Standard Edition and $3499 for the Professional Edition. To activate Agisoft PhotoScan using a standard license key, you need to follow these steps:



  • Launch Agisoft PhotoScan and click Help > Activate Product.



  • Enter your license key in the text box and click Activate.



  • You will see a confirmation message that your license key has been activated. Click OK to close the message and start using Agisoft PhotoScan.



Floating Licenses




A floating license key is a multi-user license that allows you to activate Agisoft PhotoScan on multiple computers within a local network. You can use Agisoft PhotoScan on any computer within the network as long as there are enough licenses available on the server. A floating license key costs $239 for the Standard Edition and $3999 for the Professional Edition. To activate Agisoft PhotoScan using a floating license key, you need to follow these steps:



  • Launch Agisoft PhotoScan and click Help > Activate Product.



  • Select the Floating License option and enter the IP address and port number of the license server in the text boxes. Click Activate.



  • You will see a confirmation message that your license key has been activated. Click OK to close the message and start using Agisoft PhotoScan.



One of the benefits of using a floating license key is that you can borrow a license from the server for offline work. This means that you can use Agisoft PhotoScan on a computer that is not connected to the network for a limited period of time. To borrow a license from the server, you need to follow these steps:



  • Launch Agisoft PhotoScan and click Help > Borrow License.



  • Select the duration of the borrowing period (from 1 hour to 30 days) and click Borrow.



  • You will see a confirmation message that your license has been borrowed. Click OK to close the message and start using Agisoft PhotoScan offline.



To return a borrowed license to the server, you need to follow these steps:



  • Launch Agisoft PhotoScan and click Help > Return License.



  • You will see a confirmation message that your license has been returned. Click OK to close the message and reconnect to the network.



Capturing Scenarios and Image Preprocessing




Agisoft PhotoScan can create 3D models from images using a technique called photogrammetry. Photogrammetry is the science of making measurements from photographs, especially for recovering the exact positions of surface points. In other words, photogrammetry allows you to reconstruct the shape, size, and texture of an object or a scene from a set of images taken from different angles.


To use Agisoft PhotoScan, you need to have a set of images that meet certain requirements and criteria. The quality and accuracy of your 3D models depend largely on the quality and quantity of your images. Therefore, it is important to know how to capture images and preprocess them for Agisoft PhotoScan.


How to Capture Images for Agisoft PhotoScan?




To capture images for Agisoft PhotoScan, you need to have the following equipment:



  • A digital camera with manual settings and high resolution. You can use any type of camera, such as DSLR, mirrorless, compact, or smartphone camera, as long as it can produce clear and sharp images with minimal distortion and noise.



  • A tripod or a stabilizer to hold your camera steady and avoid blurry images. You can also use your hands if you have a steady grip and a fast shutter speed.



  • A measuring tape or a ruler to measure the dimensions of your object or scene. This is optional but recommended for scaling and georeferencing your 3D models.



  • Some markers or scale bars to place on or near your object or scene. These are optional but useful for aligning and orienting your 3D models.



Once you have your equipment ready, you need to adjust your camera settings according to your capturing scenario. The main camera settings that affect your image quality are:



  • Focal length: This is the distance between the lens and the image sensor of your camera. It determines how much of your scene is captured in your image and how much it is magnified. A longer focal length means a narrower field of view and more magnification, while a shorter focal length means a wider field of view and less magnification. For Agisoft PhotoScan, it is recommended to use a fixed focal length (not zoom) that matches the size of your object or scene. For example, if you are capturing a small object, use a longer focal length (e.g., 50 mm) to fill the frame with your object. If you are capturing a large scene, use a shorter focal length (e.g., 18 mm) to capture more of your scene in one image.



  • Aperture: This is the opening in your lens that controls how much light enters your camera. It is measured in f-stops, such as f/2.8, f/4, f/8, etc. A lower f-stop number means a larger aperture and more light, while a higher f-stop number means a smaller aperture and less light. For Agisoft PhotoScan, it is recommended to use a medium aperture (e.g., f/8) that provides enough light and depth of field for your images. Depth of field is the range of distance in front of and behind your focus point that appears sharp in your image. A larger aperture (e.g., f/2.8) means a shallower depth of field and more blur in the background and foreground, while a smaller aperture (e.g., f/16) means a deeper depth of field and more sharpness in the whole image. You want to have a consistent depth of field across your images to avoid blurry or out-of-focus areas.



  • Shutter speed: This is the duration of time that your camera's shutter is open and exposes the image sensor to light. It is measured in seconds or fractions of seconds, such as 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, etc. A faster shutter speed means a shorter exposure time and less light, while a slower shutter speed means a longer exposure time and more light. For Agisoft PhotoScan, it is recommended to use a fast shutter speed (e.g., 1/250) that freezes the motion of your object or scene and avoids blurry images. A slow shutter speed (e.g., 1/15) can cause motion blur or camera shake if your object or scene is moving or if your camera is not stable.



  • ISO: This is the sensitivity of your image sensor to light. It is measured in numbers, such as 100, 200, 400, 800, etc. A higher ISO number means a higher sensitivity and more light, while a lower ISO number means a lower sensitivity and less light. For Agisoft PhotoScan, it is recommended to use a low ISO number (e.g., 100) that produces less noise and more detail in your images. Noise is the grainy or speckled appearance of your images that reduces their quality and clarity. A high ISO number (e.g., 1600) can cause more noise and less detail in your images.



After you have adjusted your camera settings, you need to choose your object or scene that you want to capture and model. The object or scene should meet the following requirements and criteria:



  • It should have enough texture and contrast for Agisoft PhotoScan to detect and match features across images. Texture is the variation of color, brightness, and pattern on the surface of your object or scene. Contrast is the difference between light and dark areas on your object or scene. Avoid objects or scenes that are too smooth, shiny, transparent, reflective, or uniform in color or pattern, as they can cause problems for Agisoft PhotoScan.



  • It should have enough overlap and coverage among images for Agisoft PhotoScan to reconstruct its shape and appearance. Overlap is the percentage of common area between two adjacent images. Coverage is the percentage of area of your object or scene that is captured by at least one image. Aim for at least 60% overlap and 100% coverage for your images.



  • It should have enough scale and resolution for Agisoft PhotoScan to create a detailed and accurate 3D model. Scale is the ratio between the real size of your object or scene and its size in your images. Resolution is the number of pixels per unit of length in your images. Choose a scale and resolution that match the level of detail that you want to achieve in your 3D model.



Once you have chosen your object or scene, you need to decide on your capturing scenario. A capturing scenario is the way that you position and move your camera around your object or scene to take images from different angles and distances. There are different types of capturing scenarios depending on the type and size of your object or scene, such as:



  • Single-object capturing: This is when you capture an isolated object that can be moved or rotated by hand or by a turntable. You can use this scenario for small objects such as toys, sculptures, artifacts, etc.



  • Multi-object capturing: This is when you capture a group of objects that are placed close together on a flat surface or a background. You can use this scenario for medium-sized objects such as furniture, appliances, instruments, etc.



  • Scene capturing: This is when you capture a large area or environment that cannot be moved or rotated easily. You can use this scenario for large objects such as buildings, landscapes, monuments, etc.



For each type of capturing scenario, there are different methods and techniques that you can use to take images from different angles and distances, such as:



  • Circular method: This is when you take images from a fixed distance around your object or scene in a circular motion. You can use this method for single-object or multi-object capturing scenarios.



  • Spiral method: This is when you take images from varying distances around your object or scene in a spiral motion. You can use this method for single-object or multi-object capturing scenarios.



  • Grid method: This is when you take images from a fixed angle across your object or scene in a grid pattern. You can use this method for scene capturing scenarios.Random method: This is when you take images from random angles and distances around your object or scene. You can use this method for any capturing scenario, but it requires more images and processing time.



For each method, there are different guidelines and recommendations that you should follow to ensure a good overlap and coverage among your images, such as:



  • For the circular method, you should take at least 20 images per circle, and at least 3 circles at different heights (top, middle, and bottom) for your object or scene.



  • For the spiral method, you should take at least 30 images per spiral, and at least 2 spirals at different directions (clockwise and counterclockwise) for your object or scene.



  • For the grid method, you should take at least 10 images per row and per column, and at least 2 rows and 2 columns for your object or scene.



  • For the random method, you should take at least 50 images from various angles and distances for your object or scene.



After you have taken your images, you need to preprocess them before loading them into Agisoft PhotoScan. Preprocessing is the process of editing and enhancing your images to improve their quality and suitability for Agisoft PhotoScan. Some of the preprocessing steps that you can perform are:



  • Cropping: This is when you cut out the unwanted parts of your images, such as the background, the borders, or the irrelevant objects. Cropping can help you reduce the file size and the processing time of your images, as well as focus on the main subject of your images.



  • Resizing: This is when you change the dimensions of your images, such as the width, the height, or the resolution. Resizing can help you optimize the scale and resolution of your images for Agisoft PhotoScan, as well as balance the quality and the speed of your processing.



  • Rotating: This is when you change the orientation of your images, such as clockwise or counterclockwise. Rotating can help you align your images with the horizontal and vertical axes of Agisoft PhotoScan, as well as correct any tilting or skewing of your images.



  • Color correction: This is when you adjust the color properties of your images, such as the brightness, the contrast, the saturation, or the hue. Color correction can help you enhance the visibility and clarity of your images, as well as reduce any color distortion or variation among your images.



  • Noise reduction: This is when you remove or reduce the noise from your images, such as the graininess, the speckles, or the artifacts. Noise reduction can help you improve the smoothness and sharpness of your images, as well as increase their accuracy and detail for Agisoft PhotoScan.



You can use any image editing software to perform these preprocessing steps, such as Photoshop, GIMP, Lightroom, etc. However, make sure that you do not overprocess your images or alter their original content or quality. Also, make sure that you save your preprocessed images in a compatible format for Agisoft PhotoScan, such as JPEG, TIFF, PNG, BMP, etc.


General Workflow and User Interface




After you have captured and preprocessed your images, you are ready to use Agisoft PhotoScan to create 3D models from them. The general workflow of Agisoft PhotoScan consists of four main steps:



  • Add Photos: This is when you load your preprocessed images into Agisoft PhotoScan and create a new project.



  • Align Photos: This is when you detect and match features among your images and generate a sparse point cloud and camera positions.



  • Build Geometry: This is when you generate a dense point cloud, a mesh, and a texture from your sparse point cloud.



  • Export Model: This is when you export your 3D model in a desired format for further editing or visualization.



To perform these steps, you need to navigate the user interface of Agisoft PhotoScan and access different tools and settings. The user interface of Agisoft PhotoScan consists of four main components:



  • Menu Bar: This is where you can access various menus and commands for Agisoft PhotoScan. You can find options for file management, project settings, workflow steps, processing options, export options, help options, and more.



  • Workspace: This is where you can view and edit your images and 3D models. You can switch between different modes and views, such as Photo Mode, Model Mode, Ortho Mode, Table Mode, etc. You can also use various tools and settings to manipulate your images and 3D models, such as zoom, pan, rotate, select, measure, edit, etc.



  • Model View: This is where you can see a 3D representation of your images and 3D models. You can change the perspective and the lighting of your model view, as well as apply different rendering modes and filters, such as solid, wireframe, shaded, textured, etc.



Photo View: This is where you can see a 2D representation of your images. You can change the size and the position of your photo view, as well as apply different tools and settings to your images, such as crop, rotate, color correction, noise reduction, etc.<


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